MACN Announces Anti-Corruption E-Learning Initiative

MACN has announced the development of an e-learning training toolkit and platform on ethics and integrity, for ship owners, managers, agents, and maritime cadet schools. Funded by MACN and the TK Foundation, the training toolkit will target different specific user-groups of employees to make it fit for the learners, including captains and crew, employees supporting crew in operational roles, and senior management. The platform and training solutions will be delivered by Videotel and Seagull Maritime, now both part of Ocean Technologies Group.

Cecilia Müller Torbrand, MACNs Executive Director said: “The maritime industry is exposed to frequent demands for corruption including cash or in-kind benefits. Ultimately, it is the master who must manage the situation when government officials make demands for corrupt payments. This results in great stress and has a detrimental effect on the health and safety of the crew. Equipping the captain with tools and support functions to say no to demands is key to stopping bribery. It is also a valuable step in building a solid anti-corruption program. With our members insight and engagement, we are building a maritime specific course which will give Master and employees working in the maritime sector, valuable guidance to tackle corrupt demands.”

MACN’s current Integrity Training Toolkit was first developed in 2014 and has been successfully deployed by several MACN members. However, there is a demand from the membership to improve and further develop this training to include stakeholders such as port agents and maritime cadet schools.

Kjell-Arne Danielsen, Senior Vice President at KGJS, MACN Steering committee member, and leading on MACNs Capability building pillar says “Many maritime academies do not have anti-corruption in their curriculum. Unless offered by individual companies, cadets do not receive any training on how to tackle integrity challenges. By open sourcing MACN’s training toolkit to maritime academies, we can better equip the next generation of seafarers with the tools to ‘say no’ to bribery before they start their professional shipping careers. This is essential to change the culture across the maritime industry.”

The delivery methods will include rich-media online and offline training on an e-learning platform. The overall learning outcomes of each training module will include increased understanding of bribery laws and the consequences of corruption; enhanced skills to identifying bribery risks and apply anti-bribery laws in real world situations; improved awareness of the criminal and financial risks of corruption for individuals and companies; and better understanding of the red flags of bribery and learn how to respond appropriately.

Manish Singh, CEO of Ocean Technologies Group commented on their selection as platform and content provider “We are immensely proud to be part to work with the MACN membership on a project that will make such a difference to the daily lives of seafarers. There’s no place for corruption in our industry and training is key to protecting seafarers from illegal demands.”

Maritime Anti-Corruption Network to Scale Up Collective Action in Nigeria with support from Siemens AG

The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN)—a global business network of over 130 companies working together to tackle corruption in the maritime industry—is expanding its Collective Action initiative in Nigeria with the support of the Siemens Integrity Initiative. The project will be implemented by MACN and the Convention on Business Integrity (CBi) and run from 2020 up to January 2023.

“Through the generous support from Siemens AG, CBi and MACN will be able to contribute to a stronger government and port authority compliance environment and encourage public-private oversight of compliance in ports and terminals. We believe this will lead to more effective seaports and terminals services, and improved corruption prevention practices that, ultimately, will benefit any business using seaports or terminals in Nigeria.” says Soji Apampa, Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Convention on Business Integrity.

The Siemens Integrity Initiative promotes projects around the world that seek to combat corruption through Collective Action. The selection process is highly competitive and favours projects that have a direct impact on the private sector and that strengthen compliance standards and legal systems. CBi was a recipient of support under the first round of funding which it used to develop a Corporate Governance Rating System (CGRS) in partnership with the Nigeria Stock Exchange.

“The Siemens Integrity Initiative is a very competitive funding call that, over the years, has supported some of the leading anti-corruption initiatives globally. For MACN, CBi, and our local stakeholders, the support from Siemens is fantastic recognition of our Collective Action work, and the impact we had in the Nigerian port and maritime sector. We are grateful for the support and excited to add Siemens to the list of donors supporting MACN” says Cecilia Müller Torbrand, Executive Director of MACN.

The project builds on, and will be integrated into, MACN and CBi’s ongoing work in Nigeria that is sponsored by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark. As a result of the Siemens Integrity Initiative support, MACN will expand its work into multiple agencies and port users, enabling greater public-private sector dialogue on integrity issues, equipping local players with proven Collective Action methodologies to drive change, and supporting maritime industry Collective Action initiatives.

“This initiative boosts Siemens efforts to support the establishment of higher integrity standards and fairer market conditions in Nigeria. We are looking forward to making this project a joint success.” Says Ms. Onyeche Tifase, CEO of Siemens Energy Nigeria.

Over the coming three years MACN and CBi will enable port users to demand, track, and ensure greater compliance in Nigerian ports, help strengthen government capability to establish compliance systems and collaboration between business, government and civil society. This will create the platform for the cultural changes that are necessary to improve trade flows in and out of Nigeria, and support the social economic growth the Nigerian government is targeting.

‘’The Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) welcomes this intervention by the CBi and MACN. Ports processes and procedures are in dire need of reforms. It is our hope that this initiative will advance the cause of the needed change process.’’ Says Muda Yusuf, DG LCCI.

Maritime Anti-Corruption Network Launches Landmark Port Integrity Campaign in Indian Ports

Copenhagen, July 4, 2019— With the support of the Government of India, the Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN)—a global business network of over 110 companies working together to tackle corruption in the maritime industry—today announces the launch of a groundbreaking Port Integrity Campaign in India.

 The campaign, which aims to reduce and (in the long term) eliminate integrity issues and bottlenecks to trade during operations in Indian ports, is a collective action of MACN, the Government of India, international organizations, and local industry stakeholders. The pilot of the campaign will take place in Mumbai ports (MbPT and JNPT) and will run until October this year.

 Key activities of the campaign include the implementation of integrity training for port officials and the establishment of clear escalation and reporting processes. Following the pilot, MACN aims to expand the program to other Indian ports.

 Cecilia Müller Torbrand, Executive Director, MACN, says: “MACN’s experiences in locations including Nigeria, the Suez Canal, and Argentina show us that real change is possible when all parties are engaged. That’s why we are delighted to have the support of so many key stakeholders for this Campaign to improve the operating environment in Indian ports.”

The Port Integrity Campaign has been made possible by strong commitment from the Indian Government to work with the private sector and to address integrity issues in Indian ports.

The Ministry of Shipping, India, stated: “We are committed to ensuring that vessels calling port in India do not face unnecessary obstacles or illicit demands. Tackling these issues is good for the shipping industry, for port workers, and for India as a trade destination. We are pleased to be joining forces with MACN and other stakeholders to implement concrete actions with the potential for real impact.”

 The MACN Port Integrity Campaign is also supported by: the United Nations Global Compact Network India (UNGCNI), the World Customs Organization (WCO), the Indian Customs and Central Excise, the Directorate General of Shipping India, the Indian Ports Association (IPA), the Indian Private Ports and Terminals Association (IPPTA), the Maritime Association of Nationwide Shipping Agencies India (MANSA), the Indian Shipowner’s Association (INSA), the Container Shipping Lines Association (CSLA), the Federation Of Indian Logistics Associations (FILA), the Danish Embassy, and the Norwegian Consulate General.

Maritime Anti-Corruption Network to Develop Global Port Integrity Index and Scale Up Collective Action in West Africa

Copenhagen, June 19, 2019—The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN)—a global business network of over 110 companies working together to tackle corruption in the maritime industry—today announces a new partnership with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark (MOFA). The partnership will allow MACN to develop and launch the first ever Global Port Integrity Index and to scale up its collective action activities in West Africa.

 The Global Port Integrity Index will provide an overview and comparison of illicit demands in ports around the world. It will be based on the unique first-hand data gathered from captains calling port around the world through MACN’s Anonymous Incident Reporting Mechanism. To date, MACN has collected over 28,000 reports of corruption in ports.

 “Through the support from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, MACN can take our world-leading incident data to the next level and turn it into a powerful advocacy tool. This index will be instrumental in highlighting the need for further investments and initiatives addressing integrity challenges in ports to promote fair global trade,” says Cecilia Müller Torbrand, Executive Director of MACN.

 The partnership with MOFA will also allow MACN to expand its collective action program in West Africa and to deepen its current engagement in the region.

 MACN has been active in Nigeria since 2011 and has, in collaboration with the Convention on Business Integrity (an internationally-recognised NGO specialized in ethics and anti-corruption in West Africa), worked to promote integrity and good governance in the port sector in Nigeria. Actions to date have included the training of over 1,000 government officials in the ports of Lagos, Calabar, Onne, and Port-Harcourt.

 Through the new project, MACN will work with the international and local maritime industry and with key government authorities in Nigeria to improve the business climate and reduce corruption in the port and maritime sector.

 “Increasing transparency and ease of doing business in the port and maritime sector is a political priority of the Nigerian government, and a network like MACN has a key role to play in enabling change that is both business-friendly and that promotes integrity and business ethics,” comments Soji Apampa, Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Convention on Business Integrity. “The members of MACN have significant commercial buying power when acting collectively. This is important for incentivizing local stakeholder from both the public and private sector to engage with us and actively address corruption”.

 The MOFA support for MACN is part of a global anti-corruption programme for 2019-2022, which extends support to civil society organisations, multilateral organisations/governments, and private sector-led initiatives.

MACN Launches 2018 Annual Report

We are pleased to share with you our 2018 Annual Report. This contains a comprehensive summary of our work and progress in 2018 under the three pillars of our strategy: Collective Action, Capability Building, and Culture of Integrity.

Below is the introductory letter from John Sypnowich, Chair of MACN:

Dear colleagues and friends,

After more than a year as Chair of the Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN), two things are very clear to me. First, the growth and momentum of our Network gives us an unprecedented opportunity to progress in the battle to eliminate corruption in the maritime industry. Second, the need for action is high: our seafarers continue to face unacceptable risks in numerous regions.

There has been a lot to celebrate in 2018. Our growth to over 100 members makes us a clear leader in private-sector anti-corruption collaborations, and our collective actions have gone from strength to strength. As an example, following the implementation of new regulations in Argentina as a result of our collective action, reports of corrupt demands in Argentine port calls to MACN’s anonymous incident reporting system have dropped by 90 percent.

That’s a big result that we should all be proud of. But we also continue to hear accounts from our seafarers—either directly or through our shared reporting system—of harassment and threats as they try to complete routine port calls. In our social media campaign last December, we shared some of these stories:

– “If facilitation is not paid we are threatened with detention or no port clearance.”

– “Cases of extortion, harassment, and threats of violence are frequent events.”

– “In many places the customs officers always try to find defects and threaten us with penalties. They waste a lot of time checking and harassing the crew.”

Changing the attitudes that create these situations is hard work. We, as a Network, have the numbers to make a difference and we have seen this year that our efforts are directly benefiting seafarers. As one put it:

“There were a few initial attempts while we passed through, but after a documented and polite denial it was clear that the vessel was part of MACN and no more questions were asked.”

These stories inspire me and remind me of what we can achieve. However, effective action requires consistent engagement from us as companies and from our partners around the world. We must keep pushing: contributing ideas and reports, coordinating our activities, working with our internal teams.

I call on all of us to maintain our commitment to work with and for each other. Let’s all work together in 2019 to bring us even closer to our goal of a maritime industry free of corruption, and together we will create a safer environment for all of our crews.

 With warm regards,

John Sypnowich, The CSL Group, Inc.; Chair, MACN

IMO To Include Anti-Corruption on Formal Agenda

iStock-941557730.jpgLast week, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) showed huge support for MACN’s work, agreeing to include maritime corruption as a regular work item on its agenda. A paper on the topic of maritime corruption was presented by the Marshall Islands with many countries and international organizations  expressing their endorsement of a proposal to develop guidelines to assist all stakeholders in embracing and implementing anti-corruption practices and procedures at the 43rd meeting of the Facilitation Committee (FAL).  The IMO will now work on a Guidance document to address maritime corruption. This is expected to be completed by 2021.

 Danish Shipping welcomed the support from the international community for this initiative. “We have a long-standing commitment to stamping out maritime corruption.  Thanks to the targeted efforts of MACN, we have seen tangible change in locations such as the Suez Canal, where facilitation payments have decreased considerably. With the IMO’s 174 member states working together on this agenda, we will stand even stronger in the fight against maritime corruption. Putting maritime anti-corruption on the IMO agenda marks a significant milestone for the maritime community as a whole”, says Anne H. Steffensen, Director General and CEO at Danish Shipping.

 The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network applauds the efforts the IMO has taken to address maritime corruption as a regular work item. MACN’s Director, Cecilia Müller Torbrand, commented “It is important for the industry to have maritime corruption recognized as a problem by the IMO in its role as the international regulator for shipping. Issues such as the wide discretionary powers held by some port officials have the potential to impact all ship owners, managers, and operators. The requirements for port entry too often lack transparency, are deliberately misapplied, or widely interpreted for private gain.”

Background
In 2018, MACN, together with leading maritime associations, started to engage the IMO on the consequences and risks facing the maritime industry in relation to maritime corruption. An IMO submission was sponsored by 12 NGO’s and submitted to the IMO’s Facilitation Committee in June 2018 (FAL 42/16/3). The submission was supported by a presentation to IMO delegates from MACN and ICS.

Maritime corruption has far-reaching consequences, it is detrimental to shipping operations and port communities, can have damaging effects on trade and investment, which in turn can have a negative effect on social and economic development. The IMO Facilitation Committee requested the IMO Secretariat provide advice on how to address this problem and invited Member States and international organizations to submit documents to the next FAL meeting with suggested actions to address this problem.

What does this mean for the industry?
This is a significant milestone both for MACN’s work and for the industry to have the IMO recognising the damaging effect corruption has on shipping and trade” says MACN’s Director Cecilia Müller Torbrand.  “Our hope is that MACN’s work will gain more leverage with IMO member states and that we can further strengthen the public-private dialogue in MACNs collective action programs (i.e. in country work).”

Congratulations to the member states and organizations who submitted the proposal this year: Liberia, Marshall Islands, Norway, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu, ICS, IAPH, BIMCO, ICHCA, IMPA, IFSMA, INTERTANKO, InterManager, IPTA, IHMA, IBIA, FONASBA, ITF and NI.

Reported Corruption Incidents down 90 Percent in Argentina

iStock-139540669-cropped.jpgAccording to the latest data from the Maritime Anti-Corruption Network’s (MACN) Anonymous Incident Reporting System, corruption incidents in Argentina where MACN has engaged in collective action have decreased by more than 90 percent. This drop follows the development of a new regulatory framework with the National Service of Health and Agri-Food Quality (Senasa), the development of a new IT system for processing and registering hold/tank inspections, and high-level government support. These developments are part of the collective action project MACN created to support reforms initiated by Senasa, other local stakeholders, and the broader shipping community in Argentina back in 2014.

MACN Program Director Cecilia Müller-Torbrand highlighted this as one of the organization’s real success stories: “In 2014, when we started this project, shipping companies operating in Argentina faced challenges in connection with the inspection of holds and tanks inspection practices. Data from MACN’s Anonymous Incident Reporting System highlighted a systemic issue with demands for payment for unclean grain holds, including cases of extortion.”

Using this data as a starting point, MACN and local partner Governance Latam conducted a fact-finding mission to fully understand the nature of the problem before building a strong coalition of local and global stakeholders.

Governance Latam Partner Fernando Basch noted the vital role of the National Service of Health and Agri-Food Quality (Senasa): “The rapid fall in corruption incidents is a direct consequence of the leadership and regulatory changes Senasa was able to put in place. The 2017 redrafting and clarification of regulations for approval of a vessel’s holds or tanks for the loading of agricultural products greatly improved operating practices for the vessel inspection process. This also allowed us to develop comprehensive training for public and private stakeholders to further reinforce the required change in behavior.”

Cecilia Müller-Torbrand commented: “The Argentine authorities demonstrated the importance of the authorities’ role. Following industry feedback, they put in place key changes to processes, systems and standards, which resulted in clarity and transparency in the inspection of warehouses and vessel tanks and holds.”

John Sypnowich, Chair of the Maritime Anti-Corruption Network, noted that the shipping community was providing a best-practice template to fight corruption: “MACN’s Argentina project should be seen by the international community as an exemplary case of public-private collective action against corruption. The results we have achieved, in a relatively short time-frame, set the benchmark for future collective actions.”

The new regulatory framework entered into force on November 1, 2017 for a one-year pilot period. Given the success and impact achieved to date, Senasa is now taking steps to maintain the new system. MACN’s support and incident data have been key drivers behind this decision and there is recognition within the industry of the ongoing need to confront corruption risks, leveraging the same collective action approach used with Senasa.

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Happy New Year!

As we reflect on 2018, we would like to acknowledge MACN’s members and partners, and all organizations who have supported MACN and the activities we have pursued. Thank you!

We are proud of the results that MACN has achieved in 2018, which include:

  • 109 members—a phenomenal 20 percent growth in membership. We welcomed new members from around the world, for instance from West Africa, Malaysia, and Israel.

  • Collection of over 27,000 anonymous incident reports to date. The reporting has helped us to engage in further dialogue with governments in Argentina, India, and Nigeria. We have also increased awareness of our anonymous reporting platform among national shipowners’ associations and local maritime service providers to encourage more reporting and transparency.

  • Progress in our collective action programs:

    • We have continued to increase participation in MACN’s Say No campaign the Suez Canal;

    • We have witnessed a 90 percent decrease in reported corrupt demands in Argentina in the ports targeted in MACN’s collective action project. MACN’s collective action in Argentina was featured in the World Economic Forum’s Report on the Future of Trust and Integrity;

    • With strong and visible support from the Indian government, we are now ready to kick off MACN’s port integrity campaign in February 2019 in Mumbai;

  • We have trained over 1,000 government officials in Nigeria.

  • Two international recognitions: MACN received a High Commendation at the SeaTrade Awards and was the winner of the 2018 SAFETY4SEA Sustainability Award.

  • Together with leading maritime organizations, MACN submitted the first paper on the consequences of maritime corruption to the International Maritime Organisation—the UN’s specialized regulatory agency for shipping.

  • We arranged our largest ever member meeting in London, and MACN’s activities and meetings continue to be rated highly by members.

MACN in 2018: More Members, More Action, More Impact

MACN members at the 2018 Fall meeting in London.

MACN members at the 2018 Fall meeting in London.

MACN was founded in 2011 by a small group of companies. It was created with the recognition that for many years, the shipping industry has faced a difficult issue: When a ship travels in and out of ports, there is an opportunity to ask for illegal payments.

For example, one captain told us recently:

“The customs officer threatened to delay the ship and fine us US$60,000 for an error on the luboil [lubrication oil] declaration. Then he asked us for US$7,000 to help us have no problem.”

These corrupt demands are bad for shipping companies, as they can lead to delays or other commercial consequences  for those who stood their ground. They are bad for the ports and governments, who acquire a reputation for corruption and have friction in the trading environment. Above all, they are bad for the ships’ captains and crews, who come under pressure to reject demands yet face threats, intimidation, and sometimes violence when they try to do so.

MACN started small, but it’s not small today: In 2018, MACN was delighted to welcome its 100th member. Members come from across the shipping value chain and include the largest vessel owners and operators, as well as associate members like companies that provide agents for ships entering ports. Collectively, MACN members represent over 25 percent of total global tonnage.

A bigger membership means a stronger collective voice when speaking with governments, ports, and customs: With over 100 members, we have real power to bring to the table and push for change. It means more resources to deliver tools and resources to members. And ultimately, it means greater impact and a better operating environment for those on the front line—the captains and crews.

Here are some of the things we have been proud to accomplish in 2018 and three reasons why we would love for you to join us.

Collective Action

MACN’s collective action in Argentina has resulted in the successful adoption of a new regulatory framework for dry bulk shipping. This year, according to MACN data submitted through our anonymous incident reporting mechanism, corruption incidents in Argentina have decreased by more than 90 percent. This has been driven in part by high-level support for the new regulatory framework from the authorities and also from high-level politicians, including the Argentine President.

Elsewhere, we have completed our collective action project in Nigeria, which was supported by (among others) the Danish Maritime Foundation, the Orient Fond, and Lauritzen Fonden. The project included training over 1,000 government officials and developing a training course on ethics for government officials. We are proud to work with local partner Soji Apampa, founder of The Convention on Business Integrity Ltd.

MACN is also preparing to launch a collective action in India, with a port integrity campaign through which vessels will prominently display signs and posters co-signed by the government about the “Say No” policy and opposition to corruption.

Culture of Integrity

In addition to collaborating with members and stakeholders to find solutions in corruption hot-spots, MACN seeks to influence the wider culture to ensure lasting change. In 2018, MACN was delighted to present its work to the Facilitation Committee (FAL) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). This was a major step in engaging the broader maritime community, and MACN is following up through a cross-industry working group.

MACN also spoke at several major conferences this year, including Transparency International’s International Anti-Corruption Conference in Copenhagen.

Finally, MACN was invited to provide testimony at the UK House of Lords on the UK Bribery Act’s effect on the maritime industry. You can watch a recording of the session here.

Our Impact

We’re delighted to see that the word is spreading, and our impact is growing. Around the world, corrupt demands in hot-spots is decreasing, and where demands are still being made, our members are better prepared, with stronger policies, more resources, and the best practices of their peers.

But don’t just take our word for it. We asked some of our members why they joined MACN, what its value was, and how it can enable fair trade to the benefit of society and all stakeholders. Watch the video below to hear from them, and if you would like to get involved, contact us.

MACN Receives SAFETY4SEA Sustainability Award

Photo by SAFETY4SEA.

Photo by SAFETY4SEA.

Earlier this month, MACN was delighted to be awarded the SAFETY4SEA Sustainability Award, sponsored by UMAR.

The winners of this year’s Awards were announced at a prestigious ceremony which took place on Tuesday 2 October, 2018 at the Yacht Club of Greece.

The awards focus exclusively on initiatives and individuals who foster Safety Excellence & Sustainable Shipping, following a combination of open nomination and audience-vote.

Presenting the award Mr. Thrasos Tsangarides, Group CEO, UMAR, said:

“The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network understands that our economic and technological growth often come at a cost. Ethical business practices are being tested and corruption is a major problem that costs trillions in bribes every year. It distorts competition, deters the free market and delays further development of social and economic growth. The answer to this centuries-old problem lies in developing corporate cultures with strong business values that understand that ethical behaviour and transparency actually add competitive advantages to organisations while enabling more trustworthy business relationships and lower costs.”

Accepting the award on behalf of MACN, Mr. Dimitris Balamatsias, DPA & HSQE Manager, Neptune Lines, stated:

Corruption is a real threat to the people who work on our ships and it damages our business and reputation. Shipping is not alone in facing this enormous problem, a problem that is too-often excused as being too hard to solve: ‘it is the way things have always been done. However, in the fight against corruption the shipping industry has shown unparalleled leadership. The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network is now over 100 members strong. We have shown that shipping companies – working together – can be more effective in fighting corruption than any regulation or press expose.”

MACN would like to thank everyone who voted for us. This award is great recognition for the hard work and commitment of our seafarers, member companies, and partners.

The SAFETY4SEA award follows MACN’s receiving a High Commendation at the 2018 Seatrade Awards, demonstrating the growing international recognition of MACN’s efforts.

In 2015, MACN was the winner of the second annual TRACE Innovation in Anti-Bribery Compliance Award (IACA) for its efforts to create an industry-wide compliance culture through collective action.